Judith Lemieux

Nov 132016
 

Green Neighbours 20
Seaton Village ∙ Annex ∙ Harbord Village ∙ UofT Kensington ∙ Baldwin Village Alexandra Park∙ Grange Park ∙ CityPlace ∙ Entertainment District

Time:
7pm, November 30th, 2016

Location:
6th Floor LHAE – (see signage for room number)
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)
University of Toronto
252 Bloor Street West (above St. George subway station)

Synopsis of Toxic Trespass
:
This NFB co-production is an investigation into the effects of the chemicals we are all exposed to in our daily lives. The film begins with the filmmaker Barri Cohen’s own 10-year-old daughter, whose blood carries carcinogens like benzene and the long-banned DDT. Then, it heads out to Windsor and Sarnia: Canadian toxic hotspots, and highlights the devastating health impacts effecting the Aamjiwnaang First Nations Community of Sarnia surrounded by refineries and petrochemical plants. The film presents passionate activists working for positive change, along with doctors and scientists who see evidence of links between environmental pollution and health problems and helps us learn about and act on the implications of environmental racism and the need for environmental justice. Carried by Cohen’s passion for truth and her disarming openness, this moving documentary is essential viewing for anyone concerned about the effects of pollutants on our – and our children’s – very DNA. An accompanying resource guide for using the film as a tool for education and social change can be found at, www.toxictrespass.ca.

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 Posted by on November 13, 2016
Nov 082016
 

Speaker: Jenise Lee (Certclean)
Written by: Sheena Jain & Esha Jain

We all use skin care products as part of our daily regimen. Whether it is the body wash we use in the shower, the lotion we lather on ourselves every morning or the soap we use while washing our hands. We unconsciously use these different substances on ourselves, but do we really know what is actually in the products we are exposing our skin to?

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 Posted by on November 8, 2016
Nov 082016
 

Speaker: Muhannad Malas
Written by: Sheena Jain & Esha Jain

Toxins exist throughout our homes; whether they are in our living room floors, our furniture or even in our cooking ware, they can be present all around us without us even knowing. Regardless of how cautious we may be toxins can be hard to escape. Many times we may be bringing harmful toxins into our homes without even realizing. This can occur due to either not knowing which products are detrimental to our health, or because of toxic ingredients not being listed on product labels. For instance, flame retardants which were originally developed as an industrial gimmick as a result of tobacco industries being blamed for causing fires. In order to overcome these accusations, tobacco companies collaborated with the furniture industry and created furniture soaked in flame retardants intended to delay the onset of fires. Unlike the U.S, Canadian policies have not mandated that flame retardants be included in product labels, in order to prevent an economic decline amongst furniture industries. This has resulted in many Canadian consumers being unaware of their presence when purchasing furniture; thereby unknowingly introducing harmful toxins into their homes. Additionally, many products include an ingredient labelled “*Fragrance”, which encompasses many toxic ingredients one of which includes phthalates. However companies are not required to include the specific chemicals that make up this ingredient on product labels. Although policies have been passed, to eliminate the use of toxins in some products, they do not necessarily prevent its use within other products. This has been demonstrated by the previous ban of BPA use in baby bottles but its continual presence in 2/3rds of Canadian cans.

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 Posted by on November 8, 2016
Nov 082016
 

Speaker: Tooba Shakeel (LEAF)
Written by: Sheena Jain & Esha Jain

Taking a stroll at the park, gardening in our backyards and cruising down the road, we have all done at least one of these things at some point in our lives but what do all of these activities have in common? In all of these scenarios you will see trees and tree-related plants like wildflower and shrubs, each of which encompasses the “urban forest. In short, the urban forest is a collection of trees that grows within a city, town or suburb. The urban forest is so important because it combats climate change and provides environmental, health, community as well as ecological benefits, to name a few.

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 Posted by on November 8, 2016