Mar 052011
 

Reviewed by Manisha Pahwa

Widely translated and read worldwide, Paulo Coelho’s The Alchemist tells a powerful story about a young Spanish shepherd named Santiago who embarks upon a journey to realize his dream of finding treasure at the pyramids in Egypt. Beginning on the cold ground at a ruined church in Spain with his flock of sixty sheep, Santiago starts his quest upon meeting a gypsy fortune teller and a mysterious and wise king. Their strong belief in him provides Santiago with the support and conviction he needs to reach Africa, where, under the heat of the desert, he inches closer towards achieving his dream. Santiago’s path is laden with both obstacles and omens – the often subtle signs that indicate which direction to follow. Although this story is about the journey and not the destination, the book’s brief ending provides readers with a moment of levity as Coelho reveals that there is much joy and humor when we discover our treasure. Continue reading »

 Posted by on March 5, 2011
Mar 052011
 

Living Downstream: An Ecologist’s Personal Investigation of Cancer and the Environment, by Sandra Steingraber
Reviewed by Marie Lorenzo

I loved reading this book. I have to admit a penchant, as I am a popular science writing junkie and would ask for the latest Stephen J. Gould for birthdays. And as is often said about her, this woman can write science really well. Of course, she is, after all, also a poet. Nonetheless, impressively, Steingraber seems to know exactly the right moment to pause the science to inject the passion, and the personal. Continue reading »

 Posted by on March 5, 2011
Mar 052011
 

Reviewed by Lindsay Gladkowski

This helpful book functions as a mindful guide to nurturing our minds and bodies to the cyclical nature of our health and all of its natural turns and twists. It is constantly flying off my bookshelf to share insight with friends and family who are motivated to learn more about their own health. It is perfect for individuals at each and every life stage as it is a reminder to take every life stage in stride and to see our health in continuous cycles.

Sat Dharam Kaur’s expertise is empowering, reader friendly and encourages us to be our own health advocates. She provides us with a comprehensive overview of steps we can take to make ourselves more mindful, prevention focused and holistically driven self-caretakers. This book not only looks at ways of cleansing and rejuvenation (by allowing our bodies to get in synch with the change of seasons) but looks at very practical ways to make food our medicine. This book is fitting into our current change of seasons as her fall program, starting September 23rd, encourages us to release physical and emotional baggage and prepare for a season of introspection.

 Posted by on March 5, 2011
Mar 052011
 

Reviewed by Fran Maclure

“There is a disconnect between the way that cell phones tie us all together and what these revolutionary tools can do to our bodies as they press up against our ears every day”. Thus starts Devra Davis’ first explanation of what kinds of disconnects exist and the hidden dangers of frequent and long-term cell phone use. In this intriguing and compelling read, she uncovers the secret history of buried past studies on the dangers of cell phone radiation and compares them with the benign reputation these ‘slick’ gadgets have today. Continue reading »

 Posted by on March 5, 2011